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Dozens of beekeepers, students, conservationists, environmental advocates, and pollinator enthusiasts of all sorts gathered at the Vermont State House today to make the case for providing greater protections for pollinators and aquatic ecosystems. “Not only do neonic pesticides lead to die offs of honeybees, wild pollinators, and birds, they also leach into groundwater and wash into surface waters with precipitation,” stated Lori Fisher, Executive Director of LCC. “This degrades water quality and harms aquatic insects, particularly mayflies and damselflies. These and other invertebrates are vital species that are a cornerstone of a healthy aquatic ecosystem.” Read...

March 2024 - Neonicotinoids, or "neonics" are versatile chemical pesticides that can be treated on a plant’s seeds so they’re built into the plant as it grows. As research continues to emerge on the harms that this class of chemicals has to the ecosystem beyond their targets, we need to seriously reconsider this practice and stop using these pesticides. Read...

What effect did the floods of Summer and again in December in 2023 have on fish? We talked with Will Eldridge from Vermont Fish and Wildlife to see what these floods did for fish from the headwaters to the lake. Read...

The four seasons of bird watching in the Northeast US: Elegant Songbird Spring, Subtle Treasures of Summer, Magnificent Fall Migrations, and the season we are now in—Weird Duck Time. Read...

The time of year for winterization is upon us: we seal windows, run heaters, open boxes of coats and mittens, and dust off sleds and skis. These are all strategies that humans in colder climes like the Lake Champlain basin employ for winter survival and enjoyment. But what about the lake’s vegetative life? How have the native aquatic plants of Lake Champlain evolved to survive winter? Read...

The Lake Champlain Committee (LCC) and the Vermont Citizens’ Advisory Committee (VT CAC) invite you to the Lake Champlain Community Sailing Center on Monday, 11/13/23 at 5:00 PM to learn more about lake issues and how Lake Champlain was affected by summer floods. Click to learn more! Read...

From afar, a patch of bright green on any body of water is cause for alarm: we are too used to the sight of cyanobacteria plaguing shallow waters close to shore. But get closer to determine what you’re seeing. It may be neither cyanobacteria nor algae, but tiny, individual plants known as duckweed. Read...