Latest Updates

Vermont is becoming warmer and wetter due to climate change. Specifically, the Vermont

Climate Assessment 2021 notes that both summer and spring precipitation have increased in

the Green Mountain State. The Assessment cautions that “[t]his spring precipitation . . . can

make farm operations difficult.” Read...

In sun and rain, heat and cold, monitors collectively filed over 2,700 reports during the 2021 season. Read...

Most monitors reported generally safe conditions during this 19th week of the monitoring season but blooms were also witnessed at select locations. Read...

Wetlands are vital natural resources that must be protected and restored for Vermont to address the impacts of climate change, protect wildlife habitat, restore, and maintain the quality of our waters, and provide other benefits for people and nature. In light of their significance, we believe the state of Vermont must commit to a “net gain” of wetlands. Read...

While color is fading on the hillsides, it unfortunately is still showing up in the water. October 20 was a particularly busy day for cyanobacteria sightings with blooms reported at a scattering of locations up and down Lake Champlain. Scroll through this email to view pictures of the conditions witnessed at Arnold Bay, Burlington beaches, Island sites, St. Albans Bay, and Lake Memphremagog during this 18th week of cyanobacteria monitoring. You’ll also find some visuals and details about duckweed, water samples rimmed with cyanobacteria, and resources and links to help you recognize, avoid, and report cyanobacteria. Read...

Unfortunately, this was another big week for blooms—with reports of cyanobacteria coming in from all sections of Lake Champlain except Malletts Bay, Missisquoi Bay, and the South Lake. Blooms were also reported from Clyde Pond, Lake Carmi, Lake Iroquois, Lake Memphremagog, and Shelburne Pond. We have fewer monitors watching the water at this time of year but blooms can still show up as evidenced by the reports and photos compiled from this week. Please use the resources and links in this email to learn how to recognize, avoid, and report cyanobacteria. Read...

Unfortunately, this was a big week for blooms—reports of cyanobacteria were chronicled at all Lake Champlain sections except the South Lake and Malletts Bay. Blooms expanded in many areas of Lake Memphremagog and were reported on Lake Carmi and Lake Iroquois. You can get a sense of the impact of a bloom by watching this video taken on 10/6/21 by Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge Manager Ken Sturm. Ken and his team witnessed an extensive swath of dense cyanobacteria in Missisquoi Bay during a 20-minute boat ride from the east delta all the way around to Long Marsh Bay. Read...

Monday, October 4th 2021

To the Vermont Climate Council,

...Significant parts of the world are literally on fire, and big portions of the rest of the nation are (or were recently) underwater. Vermont itself has recently missed being hit by not one but two massive tropical storms by mere miles, and earlier forecasts for the path of both Henri and Ida warned they might go directly through our state. And, of course, Vermonters are already experiencing more extreme heat and heavy precipitation events climate scientists have predicted for years. Read...

Clear water dominated on the cyanobacteria tracker during this first full week of fall and the 15th week of the cyanobacteria monitoring program. Most monitors who are still able to report recorded safe conditions, great for late-season recreation. Cyanobacteria was reported at one site each in Lake Champlain’s Main Lake Central and Main Lake South sections and several times during the week at Lake Carmi. Read...

Fewer reports are flowing in as we move into fall, park staff leave posts, and seasonal residents close up camps. However, late season blooms are not uncommon so please keep checking conditions whenever you recreate in or around water. Read...

The state of Vermont is developing its Climate Action Plan and drafters need your input to produce a forward-thinking guidance document that addresses the climate emergency. Seven events to gain public comments will be held throughout the state beginning tomorrow and running through early October. Read...

Although generally safe conditions dominated the cyanobacteria tracker again this week, we received reports of cyanobacteria from all Lake Champlain regions except the South Lake and Malletts Bay. Monitors also logged in bloom reports for some sites on Lake Carmi and Lake Memphremagog. Read...

Generally safe conditions prevailed at most locations again this week but cyanobacteria was reported at Lake Champlain’s Main Lake Central, Main Lake South, Missisquoi Bay, St. Albans Bay, and South Lake and at Lake Carmi and Lake Memphremagog. Read...

Windy, cooler weather helped improve water quality conditions during this eleventh week of monitoring. While generally safe conditions prevailed at most locations, cyanobacteria was reported at Lake Champlain’s Inland Sea, Missisquoi Bay, and St. Albans Bay as well as Lake Carmi and Lake Memphremagog. Read...

Cyanobacteria Monitors filed over 240 reports this past week as blooms popped up or persisted in numerous locations on Lake Champlain and several inland waterbodies. Lake Champlain’s Inland Sea, Main Lake Central, Main Lake South, Missisquoi Bay, South Lake, and St. Albans Bay all experienced blooms as did Chittenden Reservoir, Lake Carmi, Lake Iroquois, Lake Memphremagog, and Shelburne Pond. Read...

Happy Friday! Lots of green dots populated the cyanobacteria tracker this week and reports of clear water, non-filamentous green algae, and iron bacteria dominated over cyanobacteria in most areas. However, we did have cyanobacteria bloom reports from Lake Carmi and Lake Morey as well as Lake Champlain’s Inland Sea and low and high alert conditions at several St. Albans Bay sites as of today (8/20/21). Read...