Latest Updates

Calling all teachers to Camp! LCC and our Champlain Basin Education Initiative (CBEI) partners invite educators to sign up for Watershed for Every Classroom 2023/24. You’ll travel around the Lake Champlain Basin visiting farms, paddling waterways, exploring mountain tops, touring urban areas, and much more! This is a great opportunity to get outdoors and have fun while enriching your curriculum with local, engaging material. Read...

The 2022 cyanobacteria monitoring season has come to a close for LCC monitors and partners. Monitors collectively filed over 2,500 reports during this year’s 20-week season. In the links and photographs below you’ll find our last weekly report compilation for 2022; a link to sign-up to monitor in 2023; clear water scenes from Alburgh Dunes State Park, Stoney Point, and the Burlington shoreline; water samples from Burlington beaches and DAR State Park; stick season images; bike ride beauty; and which monitor filed 143 reports this season. Read...

Site coverage is scant this time of year but all 47 reports from Lake Champlain received during week 19 were of good conditions. For inland lakes, Lake Carmi had a low alert bloom and Joe’s Pond had a high alert. The latter covered a wide swath of shoreline but was short-lived. Blooms can still happen late in the season so please continue to report if you’re still in the area. Read...

Only a scattering of monitoring reports are still coming in as we move into stick season but all that do provide important data on water conditions. Lake Champlain was bloom-free for the second fall week in a row. Lake Champlain was bloom-free again for the fourth week in a row. The lone sighting of cyanobacteria came from Lake Iroquois but we only had reports from four inland lakes. Read...

Good water conditions dominated monitoring reports for the third full week of fall but there are far fewer monitors reporting this time of year on Lake Champlain and inland lakes. This week’s photos don’t show any cyanobacteria but scroll down to see what monitors observed during week 17 including... Read...

Good water conditions dominated monitoring reports for the second week in a row since we moved into the fall season but cyanobacteria blooms continued to show their colors in areas of Lake Champlain and several inland lakes. Read...

Good water conditions dominated monitoring reports during week 15 but blooms showed up in a few Lake Champlain locations as well as several inland lakes. Scroll down to see clear water at Alburgh Dunes State Park, and Graveyard Point on Lake Champlain; blooms at Lake Carmi, Lake Memphremagog, Shelburne Pond, Burlington beaches, and St. Albans Bay; and learn how to differentiate cyanobacteria from duckweed. Read...

Week 14 of monitoring brought cooler weather, fewer sightings of cyanobacteria, but also far fewer monitors to report them. High alert blooms continued in parts of St. Albans Bay, Lake Carmi, and Lake Morey which have all had persistent blooms during the last weeks or months. Read...

While the weather cooled during Week 13 of monitoring, blooms continued in several lakes or bays where they were present previously and showed up in some new locations. On Lake Champlain, high alert conditions were restricted to nutrient-rich St. Albans Bay but there were low alerts in the Inland Sea, Malletts Bay, Main Lake North, and Main Lake South. Blooms also persisted in Lake Carmi, Lake Morey, and Lake Memphremagog. Read...

Throughout his career in the U.S. Senate, Patrick Leahy has been an unfailing champion for our region's– and the nation's – air, water, and land, and the health of our people. From the Conte National Wildlife Refuge, across the Green Mountain National Forest, to Lake Champlain, his dedication to safeguarding and investing in natural resources has improved our lives. Read...

Blooms continued into Week 12 of the monitoring season. You can see visuals of some of them from Lake Memphremagog, Lake Morey, Tinmouth Pond, Shelburne Pond and Lake Champlain’s Arnold Bay and Valcour Island, and Lake Champlain’s Keeler Bay. You’ll also find photos illustrating blue-green blues and the recreational impact of cyanobacteria. Read...

Several monitors reported odd gelatinous globules in the water at several sites in Lake Champlain’s Inland Sea during week 11 of monitoring. Happily they took water samples and photographs and shared the details with us and our partner Dr. Ana Morales-Williams at the University of Vermont’s Rubenstein Ecosystem Science Laboratory. The samples turned out to be Calothrix sp. – a benthic filamentous cyanobacteria. Read...

Happy end of August! As we move towards September, please remember that blooms can still happen as summer wanes which is why we are only about half way through the monitoring season. Blooms have been witnessed through November in our region during past years and the next few months can be very active periods for blooms. Read...

We’ve had a lot of additional subscribers to our weekly cyanobacteria emails so here’s a link to all the weekly reports from the 2022 season in case you’ve missed any of them. They’re worth checking out for the compilation of reporting results, visuals of blooms, and information to help you differentiate cyanobacteria from other lake phenomena. Read...

Happily, Central Main Lake was bloom-free during week 8 of monitoring but blooms persisted in sections of St. Albans Bay and Missisquoi Bay on Lake Champlain and Lake Carmi. After a week of bloom-free reports, cyanobacteria was observed again on Lake Memphremagog. Read...

Bloom reports for the week were restricted to the Central Main Lake, St. Albans Bay, and Missisquoi Bay on Lake Champlain and to Knapp Pond and Lake Carmi for Vermont inland lakes. Read...